EM 9113    Revised December 2019

Spotted wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, is an invasive fly that lays eggs in ripening and ripe berries and stone fruits. The developing larvae can make the fruit unmarketable, so this pest is a concern to producers, packers, processors, and distributors of these crops.

Landscapes surrounding fruit production fields often include hedgerows, adjacent field margins, and woody or riparian areas with ornamentals, unmanaged shrubs, vines, or other plants that also produce fruits. Noncrop habitats can meet the requirements that favor SWD adults and their natural enemies: food, shelter, shade, and humidity. In addition, many noncrop fruits can support developing larvae of SWD. As populations of SWD build in noncrop hosts, these areas can become “hot spots” from which SWD can move into fields as commercial fruits begin to ripen. In some regions, these plants are important for late season population buildup outside crop fields.

From this publication, commercial and backyard fruit growers and field advisors will learn which plants can serve as alternate egg-laying sites for SWD. This list of noncommercial fruits was developed from multiyear sampling to determine likely noncrop hosts for SWD larvae. Regional differences in the importance of each plant host may occur due to differences in environmental conditions. The list is not exhaustive but includes what is known at this time about plants commonly found in British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, California, Michigan, New York, and Florida. We expect this list to expand as more becomes known about noncrop hosts for SWD.

Noncrop fruits found to support SWD larval development

in fruit-producing regions of North America

Common name

Scientific name1

Family

Fruit timing

Barberry: hollyleaved

Berberis aquifolium

Berberidaceae

Summer-fall

Blackberry: Allegheny, Himalaya

Rubus allegheniensis, R. bifrons

Rosaceae

Summer-fall

Buckthorn: cascara, common

Rhamnus purshiana, R. cathartica

Rhamnaceae

Late summer-fall

Cherry: wild, mahaleb, black, chokecherry

Prunus avium, P. mahaleb,
P. serotina, P. virginiana L.

Rosaceae

Summer

Cotoneaster: milkflower

Cotoneaster lacteus

Rosaceae

Spring-summer

Currant: golden, northern black

Ribes aureum, R. hudsonianum

Grossulariaceae

Summer

Dogwood: silky, stiff, Japanese, gray, redosier2

Cornus amomum, C. canadensis, C. foemina, C. kousa, C. racemosa, C. sericea

Cornaceae

Summer-fall

Elderberry: blue, black, Rocky Mountain elder

Sambucus nigra spp. cerulean, S. nigra, S. racemosa var. melanocarpa

Adoxaceae

Summer-fall

Fig

Ficus carica

Moraceae

Summer-fall

Holly: mountain

Ilex mucronata

Aquifoliaceae

Late summer-fall

Honeysuckle: Bell’s, blue, Japanese, Morrow’s, tatarian

Lonicera X bella, L. caerulea, L. japonica,
L. morrowii, L. tatarica

Caprifoliaceae

Summer-fall

Laurel: cherry, Portugal

Prunus laurocerasus, P. lusitanica

Rosaceae

Summer-fall

Mulberry: ‘Illinois ever bearing’, black, red

Morus alba x rubra, M. nigra,
M. rubra

Moraceae

Summer-fall

Nightshade: American, bittersweet2

Solanum americanum, S. dulcamara

Solanaceae

Winter, summer-fall

Oleaster: autumn olive

Elaeagnus umbellata

Elaeagnaceae

Summer

Orange jasmine

Murraya paniculata

Rutaceae

Fall

Pokeweed: American

Phytolacca americana

Phytolaccaceae

Summer-fall

Salmonberry

Rubus spectabilis

Rosaceae

Summer

Snowberry: common2

Symphoricarpos albus

Caprifoliaceae

Fall-winter

Spicebush

Lindera benzoin

Lauraceae

Fall

Spinach: Indian or Ceylon

Basella alba

Basellaceae

Fall

Sweet box

Sarcococca confusa

Buxaceae

Fall-spring

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