EM 8329    Revised May 2020

This guide lists recommendations for insect, mite and disease control in cherry orchards. The chemicals, formulations and application rates listed here are based on label directions, research and orchard experience.

Pest management depends on producers and their knowledge of the orchard and its characteristics. Producers must weigh several factors: cultivar, tree size, tree density, canopy characteristics, pest complex and pest history. Consider all these factors when choosing which chemicals to apply and at what rates. Other variables include the amount of water used per acre, and the method of application.

Trade name products are mentioned as examples only. Occasionally, manufacturers register different formulations of a product that contain a different concentration of active ingredient. This does not mean that OSU Extension either endorses these products or intends to discriminate against products not mentioned. Consult product labels to determine whether their use confers advantages over the products listed in this guide.

Always refer to the pesticide label for use instructions. It is the legal document.

Producers ask two common questions about the chemical control of insects and diseases:

  • “How much chemical do I use per acre?”
  • “What is the least amount of water I need per acre to apply in my concentrate sprayer?”

The schedule below suggests an amount of formulated product to use per acre, and not the amount of active ingredient. This amount is based on a “typical” orchard of middle age and average tree density, with moderate pest pressure. Less product may be needed in 1- to 4-year-old orchards. Conversely, more chemical (within label limits) may be required for large, mature trees experiencing heavy pressure from multiple pests.

Many insecticide labels today list the minimum amount of water needed per acre in concentrate sprays of insecticides. Labels also tell users how to calculate the amount of chemical needed per acre in a concentrate sprayer. CHECK THE LABEL BEFORE SPRAYING! Some label directions indicate dilute applications only, such as the dimethoate labels for cherry fruit fly control. Also:

  • Make sure any tank-mixes of pesticides are compatible. For example, the elevated pH of some boron spray solutions weakens many insecticides.
  • Use adjuvants and spreader stickers with caution.

Important: Be aware of worker protection standards. All new pesticide labels provide orchard re-entry intervals and personal protection equipment information. See Oregon standards.

Cherry pest control recommendations

Use only one material except where a combination is indicated. Follow label precautions when tank-mixing oils, fungicides, and insecticides. Materials are not listed in order of preference. Copper-based products alone have not worked well under conditions favorable for bacterial canker development.

STAGES 0–1: Dormant and delayed dormant Before buds open and before eggs hatch

Pest or disease/
material

Active ingredient

Application
rate/acre

Comments/re-entry interval

Scale insects, mite eggs, aphids, eggs and larvae of certain leafrollers, peach twig borer, and bud moth. Note: When using a WP formulation with oil, fill sprayer tank one-third full with water, turn on agitator, slowly add the WP, fill tank one-half full with more water, add oil. Keep agitator running, finish filling. Thorough coverage is essential. Dilute sprays recommended during this stage. Liquid formulations mix best with oil and water.

Horticultural mineral oil (HMO) + an insecticide registered for these pests, such as:

Centaur 70WDG

buprofezin

34.5–46 oz

Group 16 insecticide (IGR). No more than 2 applications per season. Do not tank mix with oil. 12-hour reentry.

Cobalt

chlorpyrifos +
lambda-cyhalothrin

4–6.25 oz

Group 1B + group 3 insecticide. Restricted use. Premix product. See label, as both AIs have cumulative limits/season. Cold/dry conditions may cause phytotoxicity. Avoid contact with sweet cherry foliage. 4-day reentry.

Diazinon 50WP

diazinon

4 lb

Group 1B insecticide. Restricted use. Limited to one dormant and one cover spray per season. Closed cab required. 24-hour reentry.

Esteem 35WP

pyriproxyfen

4–5 oz

Group 7C insecticide. Limited to 3 applications per season. Targets eggs and immature (molting) stages of leafrollers. 12-hour reentry.

Exirel 0.83SE

cyantraniliprole

10–20.5 oz

Group 28 insecticide. No more than 0.4 lb ai/A per season. Targets leafroller and peach twig borer at this timing. Use the high rate for dormant and the low rate for delayed dormant. 12-hour reentry.

Supracide 2E

methidathion

1–2 or
3–12 pt

Group 1B insecticide. Supracide may be used without oil for San Jose scale control. Do not apply when blossoms are open. Avoid residues by limiting to one application per season. 3-day reentry.

Shothole borer (see footnote 4). Note: Make first application in late February or March when overwintering adults first emerge. Spot treat infestations within orchard. Apply to infested trunk and limbs until runoff. Once beetles are in trees they cannot be controlled with insecticides.

Azera Pro

azadirachtin + pyrethrins

1-2 pt

Group 3A insecticide. OMRI listed for organic agriculture. Avoid contact with blooming crops, weeds or cover crops. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Lorsban 75 WG

chlorpyrifos

1.33-2 lb

Group 1B insecticide. Do not use Lorsban on sweet cherries after budbreak. For growing season applications (tart cherries only), target infested and neighboring tree trunks and small limbs. 4-day reentry.

PyGanic EC

pyrethrins

1 pt- 2qt

Group 3A insecticide. OMRI listed for organic agriculture. Adjust pH of spray mixture to 5.5-7.0. Avoid contact with blooming crops, weeds or cover crops. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

STAGES 2–5: Popcorn stage Brown buds turn white just before opening

Pest or disease/
material

Active ingredient

Application
rate/acre

Comments/re-entry interval

Brown rot blossom blight (see footnote 2)

Abound

azoxystrobin

12–15.5 fl oz

Group 11 fungicide. See footnote 6. Do not use with silicone-based surfactants. 4-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Bravo Weather Stik

chlorothalonil

3–4.1 pt

Group M5 fungicide. Do not apply later than shuck split. 12-hour reentry.

Cabrio EG

pyraclostrobin

9.5 oz

Group 11 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Captan 80WDG

captan

1.9–2.5 lb

Group M4 fungicide. 24-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

CaptEvate 68WDG

captan + fenhexamid

3.75 lb

Group M4 + Group 17 (Captan + Elevate) 24-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Elevate 50WDG

fenhexamid

1–1.5 lb

Group 17 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Fontelis

penthiopyrad

14–20 fl oz

Group 7 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Indar 2F

fenbuconazole

6 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Inspire

difenoconazole

7 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Luna Sensation

fluopyram + trifloxystrobin

5–7.6 fl oz

Group 7 + 11 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 1-day PHI.

Merivon

fluxapyroxad + pyraclostrobin

4–6.7 fl oz

Group 7 + 11 fungicide. Do not use with EC or oil-based products. Only nonionic surfactants can be used within 14 days of harvest. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Microthiol Disperss or many others

sulfur (80%)

10-20 lb

Group M2 fungicides. Do not use within 2 weeks of an oil spray. 24-hr reentry.

Miravis

pydiflumetofen

3.4-5.1 fl oz

Group 7 fungicide. 4-hr reentry. 0-day PHI

Orius 20 AQ

tebuconazole

8.6–17.2 oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Pristine

pyraclostrobin + boscalid

10.5–14.5 oz

Group 7 + 11 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. See footnote 6. 0-day PHI.

Procure and generics

triflumizole

10–16 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 1-day PHI.

Quadris Top

azoxystrobin + difenoconazole

12–14 fl oz

Group 3 + 11 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Quash

metconazole

2.5–4 oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 14-day PHI.

Quilt Xcel

azoxystrobin + propiconazole

14 fl oz

Group 3 + 11 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. See footnote 6. 0-day PHI.

Rally 40WSP

myclobutanil

2.5–6 oz

Group 3 fungicide. 24-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Rovral 4F or generics

iprodione

1–2 pt

Group 2 fungicide. Do not make more than 2 applications per season. Do not use past shuck split. See footnote 3. 24-hour reentry.

Tilt and generics

propiconazole

4 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

TopGuard

flutriafol

14 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 7-day PHI.

TopGuard EQ

azoxystrobin + flutriafol

6–8 fl oz

See footnote 6. Do not use with silicone surfactants. Group 3 + 11 fungicide. 12-hr reentry. 7-day PHI.

Topsin 4.5FL

thiophanate-methyl

20–30 oz

Group 1 fungicide. Tank-mix with another fungicide. 2-day reentry. 1-day PHI.

Topsin 4.5FL

thiophanate-methyl

20–30 oz

Group 1 fungicide. Tank-mix with another fungicide. 2-day reentry. 1-day PHI.

Ziram 76DF

Ziram

5–6 lb

Group M3 fungicide. Do not apply after first cover. 48-hour reentry. 30-day PHI.

Aphids, bud moth, leafrollers, thrips
Note: Aphids usually are of concern only on young trees. On mature trees, a spray 2 weeks after shuck fall is effective.

Actara

thiamethoxam

2–2.75 oz

Group 4A insecticide. Aphids, thrips, and leafrollers at this timing. No more than 11 oz/A per season (of this and/or any other thiamethoxam product).
12-hour reentry.

Altacor 35 WDG

chlorantraniliprole

2–4 oz

Group 28 insecticide. Leafroller only. 4-hour reentry.

Bacillus thuringensis (B.t.)

bacterium

See label.

Group 11B2 insecticide. Generic. OMRI listed. Can provide excellent, targeted control of leafrollers. Apply when temperatures exceed 60°F. Repeat application 2–3 times. 4-hour reentry.

Delegate 25WG

spinetoram

4.5–7 oz

Group 5 insecticide. Leafroller and thrips only at this timing. 4-hour reentry.

Diazinon 50WP

diazinon

4 lb

Group 1B insecticide. Restricted use. Limited to one dormant and one cover spray per season. Closed cab required. Allow 5 days before introducing bees.
24-hour reentry.

Entrust SC

spinosad

4–8 oz

Group 5 insecticide. OMRI listed for organic use. No more than 3 applications of Group 5 materials per year or 29 oz Entrust. Targets leafrollers and thrips at this timing. 4-hour reentry, 7-day PHI.

Intrepid 2F

methoxyfenozide

8–16 oz

Group 18 insecticide (IGR). Leafroller only.
4-hour reentry.

Success 2L

spinosad

4–8 oz

Group 5 insecticide. Leafroller and thrips only.
4-hour reentry.

Transform WG

sulfoxaflor

0.75-1.5 lb (aphids), 2.75 lb (thrips)

Group 4C insecticide. Avoid drift to flowering cover crops and weeds. No more than 8.5 oz per year. 24-hour reentry. 7- day PHI.

Syneta beetle (see footnote 5)
Note: A local problem in certain Valley orchards. Adults may emerge and require control between early popcorn and petal fall. Place a beating tray or sheet under limbs and shake or tap branches to find beetles. Most damage is seen on pinhead-size and smaller cherries. Insecticides should be applied no later than shuck fall if this prebloom application is not made.

Entrust SC

spinosad

4–8 oz

Group 5 insecticide. OMRI listed for organic use. No more than 3 applications of Group 5 materials per year or 29 oz Entrust. 4-hour reentry, 7-day PHI.

Imidan 70WP

phosmet

1.3 lb

Group 1B insecticide. Restricted use. Early popcorn is the time to treat if weather allows. Tart cherries only. Wait at least 5 days before introducing bees. If not spraying pre-bloom, spray at petal fall but before shuck fall—after bees are removed. 3-day reentry.

Success

spinosad

4–8 oz

Group 5 insecticide. No more than 4 applications or 29 oz per year. 4-hour reentry.

Stages 6–7: Full bloom

Brown rot blossom blight (see footnote 2)
See materials listed for popcorn stage.

Petal fall 75% petal fall

Pest or disease/
material

Active ingredient

Application
rate/acre

Comments/re-entry interval/preharvest interval (PHI)

Brown rot blossom blight (see footnote 3)
See materials listed for popcorn stage.

Leaf spot (see footnote 2)

Bravo Weather Stik

chlorothalonil

3–4.1 pt

Group M5 fungicide. Do not apply after shuck split.
12-hour reentry.

Captan 80WDG

captan

1.9–2.5 lb

Group M4 fungicide. 24-hour reentry.

Echo 720

chlorothalonil

3–4.1 pt

Group M5 fungicide. 12-hour reentry.

Flint Extra

trifloxystrobin

2.5–3.8 oz

Group 11 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 1-day PHI.

Indar 2F

fenbuconazole

6 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Luna Sensation

fluopyram + trifloxystrobin

5–7.6 fl oz

Group 7 + 11 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 1-day PHI.

Merivon

fluxapyroxad + pyraclostrobin

4–6.7 fl oz

Group 7 + 11 fungicide. Do not use with EC or oil-based products. Only nonionic surfactants can be used within 14 days of harvest. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Orius 20 AQ

tebuconazole

8.6–17.2 oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Pristine

pyraclostrobin + boscalid

10.5–14.5 oz

Group 7 + 11 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. See footnote 6. 0-day PHI.

Procure and generics

triflumizole

10–16 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 1-day PHI.

Quilt Xcel

azoxystrobin + propiconazole

14 fl oz

Group 3 + 11 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. See footnote 6. 0-day PHI.

Rally 40WSP

myclobutanil

2.5–6 oz

Group 3 fungicide. 24-hour reentry. 7-day PHI.

Syllit FL

dodine

1–3 pt

Group U12 fungicide. 48-hour reentry. 7-day PHI.

Tilt and generics

propiconazole

4 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

TopGuard

flutriafol

14 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 7-day PHI.

TopGuard EQ

azoxystrobin + flutriafol

6–8 fl oz

See footnote 6. Do not use with silicone surfactants. Group 3 + 11 fungicide. 12-hr reentry. 7-day PHI.

Ziram 76DF

ziram

6 lb

Group M3 fungicide. 48-hour reentry. 30-day PHI.

Aphids, bud moth, leafrollers
Note: If this petal fall spray is used (particularly systemic materials against aphids), spray only after bloom and after bees have been removed from orchard.

Actara

thiamethoxam

2–2.75 oz

Group 4A insecticide. Targets aphids at this timing. No more than 11 oz/A per season (of this and/or any other thiamethoxam product). 12-hour reentry.

Altacor 35 WDG

chlorantraniliprole

2–4 oz

Group 28 insecticide. Targets leafroller with this timing. 4-hour reentry.

Assail 70WP

acetemiprid

1.1–2.3 oz

Group 4A insecticide. Targets aphids with this timing. 12-hour reentry. Note that SG formulation also available and rates differ. 7-day PHI.

Bacillus thuringensis (B.t.)

bacterium

See label.

Group 11B2 insecticide. Generic. OMRI listed. Can provide excellent control of leafrollers. Apply when temperatures exceed 60°F. Repeat application 2–3 times. 4-hour reentry.

Delegate 25WG

spinetoram

4.5–7 oz

Group 5 insecticide. Targets leafroller with this timing. 4-hour reentry.

Entrust SC

spinosad

4–8 oz

Group 5 insecticide. OMRI listed for organic use. No more than 3 applications of Group 5 materials per year or 29 oz Entrust. 4-hour reentry, 7-day PHI.

Imidacloprid 2F

imidacloprid

3.2–6.4 oz

Group 4A insecticide. Generic, several product names. Targets aphids with this timing. Do not apply when bees are active. 12-hour reentry.

Intrepid 2F

methoxyfenozide

8–16 oz

Group 18 insecticide (IGR). Targets leafroller with this timing. 4-hour reentry.

Success 2L

spinosad

4–8 oz

Group 5 insecticide. Targets leafroller with this timing. 4-hour reentry.

Transform WG

sulfoxaflor

0.75-1.5 lb

Group 4C insecticide. Targets aphids. Avoid drift to flowering cover crops and weeds. No more than 8.5 oz per year. 24-hour reentry. 7- day PHI.

Syneta beetle: See materials listed for popcorn stage.

Shuck split

Pest or disease/
material

Active ingredient

Application
rate/acre

Comments/re-entry interval/preharvest interval (PHI)

Leaf spot

Bravo Weather Stik

chlorothalonil

3–4.1 pt

Group M5 fungicide. Do not apply after shuck split.
12-hour reentry.

Captan 80WDG

captan

1.9–2.5 lb

Group M4 fungicide. 24-hour reentry.

Echo 720

chlorothalonil

3–4.1 pt

Group M5 fungicide 12-hour reentry.

Flint Extra

trifloxystrobin

2.5–3.8 oz

Group 11 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 1-day PHI.

Indar 2F

fenbuconazole

6 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Luna Sensation

fluopyram + trifloxystrobin

5–7.6 fl oz

Group 7 + 11 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 1-day PHI.

Merivon

fluxapyroxad + pyraclostrobin

4–6.7 fl oz

Group 7 + 11 fungicide. Do not use with EC or oil-based products. Only nonionic surfactants can be used within 14 days of harvest. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Orius 20 AQ

tebuconazole

8.6–17.2 oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Pristine

pyraclostrobin + boscalid

10.5–14.5 oz

Group 7 + 11 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. See footnote 6. 0-day PHI.

Procure and generics

triflumizole

10–16 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 1-day PHI.

Quilt Xcel

azoxystrobin + propiconazole

14 fl oz

Group 3 + 11 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. See footnote 6. 0-day PHI.

Rally 40WSP

myclobutanil

2.5–6 oz

Group 3 fungicide. 24-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Syllit FL

dodine

1–3 pt

Group U12 fungicide. 48-hour reentry. 7-day PHI.

Tilt and generics

propiconazole

4 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

TopGuard

flutriafol

14 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 7-day PHI.

TopGuard EQ

azoxystrobin + flutriafol

6–8 fl oz

See footnote 6. Do not use with silicone surfactants. Group 3 + 11 fungicide. 12-hr reentry. 7-day PHI.

Ziram 76DF

ziram

6 lb

Group M3 fungicide. 48-hour reentry. 30-day PHI.

Shothole (see footnote 7)

Captan 80WDG

captan

1.9–2.5 lb

Group M4 fungicide. 24-hour reentry.

Echo 720

chlorothalonil

3–4.1 pt

Group M5 fungicide. 12-hour reentry.

Fontelis

penthiopyrad

14–20 fl oz

Group 7 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Ziram 76DF

ziram

6 lb

Group M3 fungicide. 30-day PHI.

Powdery mildew
Note: Can be a problem in some years in western Oregon. Materials used for brown rot and/or leaf spot can be effective on this disease as well.

Two weeks after shuck fall

Pest or disease/
material

Active ingredient

Application
rate/acre

Comments/re-entry interval/preharvest interval (PHI)

Leaf spot
See materials listed for shuck split.

Aphids
Note: Aphids are of concern primarily in young orchards. Use this spray if the popcorn spray was not made and aphids are increasing.

Actara

thiamethoxam

2–2.75 oz

Group 4A insecticide. No more than 11 oz/A per season (of this and/or any other thiamethoxam product).
12-hour reentry.

Diazinon 50WP

diazinon

4 lb

Group 1B insecticide. Restricted use. Limited to one dormant and one cover spray per season. Closed cab required. 24-hour reentry.

Transform WG

sulfoxaflor

0.75-1.5 lb

Group 4C insecticide. Avoid drift to flowering cover crops and weeds. No more than 8.5 oz per year. 24-hour reentry. 7- day PHI.

Late spring and summer

Pest or disease/
material

Active ingredient

Application
rate/acre

Comments/re-entry interval/preharvest interval (PHI)

Brown rot on fruit
Note: Apply materials prior to harvest before wet weather is expected. Pay close attention to preharvest spray restrictions.

Abound

azoxystrobin

12–15.5 fl oz

Group 11 fungicide. See footnote 6. Do not use with silicone-based surfactants. 4-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Cabrio EG

pyraclostrobin

9.5 oz

Group 11 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Captan 80 WDG

captan

2–2.5 lb

Group M4 fungicide. 24-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

CaptEvate 68WDG

captan + fenhexamid

3.75 lb

Group M4 + Group 17. (Captan + Elevate)
24-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Elevate 50WDG

fenhexamid

1–1.5 lb

Group 17 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Fontelis

penthiopyrad

14–20 fl oz

Group 7 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Indar 2F

fenbuconazole

6 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Inspire

difenoconazole

7 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Luna Sensation

fluopyram + trifloxystrobin

5–7.6 fl oz

Group 7 + 11 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 1-day PHI.

Merivon

fluxapyroxad + pyraclostrobin

4–6.7 fl oz

Group 7 + 11 fungicide. Do not use with EC or oil-based products. Only nonionic surfactants can be used within 14 days of harvest. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Miravis

pydiflumetofen

3.4-5.1 fl oz

Group 7 fungicide. 4-hr reentry. 0-day PHI

Orius 20 AQ

tebuconazole

8.6–17.2 oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Procure and generics

triflumizole

10–16 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 1-day PHI.

Quadris Top

azoxystrobin + difenoconazole

12–14 fl oz

Group 3 + 11 fungicide. 12-hr reentry. 0-day PHI.

Quash

metconazole

2.5–4.0 oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 14-day PHI.

Quilt Xcel

azoxystrobin + propiconazole

14 fl oz

Group 3 + 11 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. See footnote 6. 0-day PHI.

Sulfur, wettable (92%)

inorganic sulfur

5–10 lb

Group M fungicide. Phytotoxic when temperatures
over 85°F. 24-hour reentry.

Tilt and generics

propiconazole

4 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

TopGuard

flutriafol

14 fl oz

Group 3 fungicide. 12-hour reentry. 7-day PHI.

TopGuard EQ

azoxystrobin + flutriafol

6–8 fl oz

See footnote 6. Do not use with silicone surfactants. Group 3 + 11 fungicide. 12-hr reentry. 7-day PHI.

Topsin 4.5FL

thiophanate-methyl

20–30 fl oz

Group 1 fungicide. Tank-mix with another fungicide. See footnote 3. 2-day reentry. 1-day PHI.

Bacterial canker, cherry witches’ broom

None

Prune out cankers and dead limbs during dry weather.

Cherry fruit fly
Note: First emergence can be in early May or as late as mid-June depending on location, elevation, weather, slope and population pressure of an orchard. Growers should obtain emergence dates and base spray timing on local emergence information or the phenology model (available from uspest.org).

Actara

thiamethoxam

4.5–5.5 oz

Group 4A insecticide. No more than 11 oz/A per season (of this and/or any other thiamethoxam product).
12-hour reentry. 7-day PHI.

Asana XL

esfenvalerate

4.8–14.5 fl oz

Group 3 insecticide. Restricted use. Do not apply past the white bud/prebloom stage. Do not apply more than 0.2 lb a.i./A per season. May aggravate spider mite problems. See label for concentrate rate.
12-hour reentry. 14-day PHI.

Assail 70WP

acetemiprid

2.3–3.4 oz

Group 4A insecticide. No more than 4 applications per season. Note that SG formulation also available and rates difer. 12-hour reentry. 7-day PHI.

Delegate WG

spinetoram

4.5 oz

Group 5 insecticide. Avoid repeated applications targeting cherry fruit fly. Apply no less than 1 week apart, maximum 4 times per season. 7-day PHI.

Diazinon 50WP

diazinon

4 lb

Group 1B insecticide. Restricted use. Limited to one dormant and one cover spray per season. Closed cab required. WPs may leave residues visible at harvest. 24-hour reentry. 21-day PHI.

Dimethoate 4E/400EC

dimethoate

2.66 pt

Group 1B insecticide. Restricted use. Apply once at 7 days following cherry fruit fly emergence. Do not mix dimethoate with Syllit. Phytotoxicity can occur and varies from marginal leaf burn to defoliation. Thorough coverage is important. Use only once per season.
10- to 14-day reentry. 21-day PHI.

Entrust SC

spinosad

4-8 oz

Group 5 insecticide. OMRI listed for organic use. No more than 3 applications of Group 5 materials per year or 29 oz Entrust. 4-hour reentry, 7-day PHI.

Exirel 0.83SE

cyantraniliprole

10–17 oz

Group 28 insecticide. No more than 0.4 lb ai/A per season. Targets leafroller and peach twig borer at this timing. Use the high rate for dormant and the low rate for delayed dormant. 12-hour reentry.

GF-120 NF

spinosad + bait compounds

10–20 oz

Group 5 insecticide. OMRI listed. Attracticide bait spray. Does not control spotted wing drosophila. Begin applications when flies emerge or 2–3 weeks before ripening. Apply to inner canopy and underside of leaves using coarse nozzles. Repeat applications on 7- to 14-day intervals. 4-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Imidacloprid 2F

imidacloprid

4.8–6.4 oz

Group 4 insecticide. Generic; several product names.
12-hour reentry. 7-day PHI.

Imidan

imidan

2.125 lb

Group 1B insecticide. Restricted use. Tart cherries only. 3-day reentry, or 14-day reentry for general public as in “U-pick”. 14-day PHI.

Malathion

malathion

See labels.

Group 1B insecticide. Many formulations and product names are available: WP, ULV, and EC. WPs may leave residues visible at harvest. ULV formulation is not a standalone product for SWD; do not use sequential sprays of ULV formulation. Repeated applications can cause secondary pest problems (mites and leafminers). Cross-resistance with other Group 1B materials and carbaryl (Sevin). Potential phytotoxicity.
12-hour reentry. 1- to 3-day PHI.

Sevin 4F

carbaryl

1.5–2 qt

Group 1A insecticide. Restricted use. Note other formulations available. 12-hour reentry. 3-day PHI.

Success 2L

spinosad

4–8 oz

Group 5 insecticide. 4-hour reentry. 7-day PHI.

Voliam Flexi

thiamethoxam + chlorantraniliprole

6–7 oz

Group 4A + 28 insecticide. No more than 14 oz per season. No more than 0.172 lb of thiamethoxam products (i.e., Actara) per season. Do not apply by air. 12-hour reentry. 14-day PHI.

Warrior II

lambda-cyhalothrin

2.6–5.1 oz

Group 3 insecticide. Restricted use. Several product names, also a component in premix formulations. Can cause secondary pest problems at this timing. 1-day reentry. 14-day PHI.

Spotted wing drosophila
Note: Begin monitoring just before fruit starts to change to its ripening color, or earlier to monitor population levels. See footnote 8.

Baythroid XL

beta-cyfluthrin

2.4–2.8 oz

Group 3 insecticide. Restricted use. Rotate with other resistance management groups. 12-hour reentry. 7-day PHI.

Danitol 2.4EC

danitol

10.66–21.33 oz

Group 3 insecticide. Restricted use. Rotate with other resistance management groups. 24-hour reentry.
3-day PHI.

Delegate WG

spinetoram

4.5–7 oz

Group 5 insecticide. Apply no less than 1 week apart, maximum 4 times per season. 4-hour reentry.
7-day PHI.

Diazinon 50WP

diazinon

4 lb

Group 1B insecticide. Restricted use. Limited to one dormant and one cover spray per season. Closed cab required. WPs may leave residues visible at harvest. 24-hour reentry. 21-day PHI.

Dimethoate 4E/400EC

dimethoate

2.66 pt

Group 1B insecticide. Restricted use. Do not mix dimethoate with Syllit. Phytotoxicity can occur and varies from marginal leaf burn to defoliation. Thorough coverage is important. Use only once per season. 10- or 14-day reentry. 21-day PHI.

Entrust SC

spinosad

4-6.4 oz

Group 5 insecticide. OMRI listed for organic use. No more than 3 applications of Group 5 materials per year or 29 oz of Entrust. See SLN 24(c) label for management of spotted wing drosophila in cherry. 4-hour reentry, 3-day PHI.

Exirel 0.83SE

cyantraniliprole

13.5–20.5 oz

Group 28 insecticide. Some risk of fruit marking. No more than 0.4 lb ai/A per season. 12-hour reentry. 3-day PHI.

Malathion

malathion

See labels.

Group 1B insecticide. Many formulations and product names are available: WP, ULV, and EC. WPs may leave residues visible at harvest. ULV formulation is not a standalone product for SWD; do not use sequential sprays of ULV formulation. Repeated applications can cause secondary pest problems (mites and leafminers). Cross-resistance with other Group 1B materials and carbaryl (Sevin). Potential phytotoxicity. 12-hour reentry. 1- to 3-day PHI.

Mustang Maxx 8EC

zeta-cypermethrin

4 oz

Group 3 insecticide. Applications must be 7 days apart. 12-hour reentry. 14-day PHI.

Sevin 4F

carbaryl

2–3 qt

3 lb

Group 1A insecticide. Note: other formulations available. Repeated applications can cause secondary pest problems (mites and leafminers). Cross-resistance with Group 1B materials. Potential phytotoxicity.
12-hour reentry. 3-day PHI.

Success 2L

spinosad

4–8 oz

Group 5 insecticide. 4-hour reentry. 7-day PHI.

Warrior II

lambda-cyhalothrin

1.28–2.56

Group 3A insecticide. Restricted use. Can cause secondary pest problems at this timing. 1-day reentry. 14-day PHI.

Shothole borer (see footnote 4)
Note: Spot-treat as needed. See Delayed Dormant Stage.

Pear slugs
Note: Usually controlled with insecticides applied for control of other pests. Pear slugs should be controlled on young trees during “establishment years.”

Fruit cracking

hydrated lime

20–25 lb

Thorough coverage of fruit is essential. Will reduce, not eliminate, cracking.

Postharvest

Pest or disease/
material

Active ingredient

Application
rate/acre

Comments/re-entry interval/preharvest interval (PHI)

Shothole borer (see footnote 4)

Spider mites
Note: Spider mites seldom are a problem on cherries in the Willamette Valley except on young trees.

Acramite 50WS

bifenazate

0.75–1 lb

Unclassified mode of action. Do not use more than once per season. 12-hour reentry. 3-day PHI.

Apollo 4SC

clofentezine

4–8 oz

Group 10A miticide. Do not use more than once per season. Do not rotate with other group 10A materials in the same season. 12-hour reentry. 21-day PHI.

Envidor 2SC

spirodiclofen

16–18 oz

Group 23 miticide. Targets rust and spider mites. Do not use more than once per season. 12-hour reentry. 7-day PHI.

Horticultural mineral oil (HMO)

mineral oil

1–2 gal

Can cause phytotoxicity if applied within 2 weeks of a sulfur application. 4-hour reentry. 0-day PHI.

Nexter 75WSB

pyridaben

5.2–10.6 oz

Group 21A miticide. Ground application only. Two applications per season. 12-hour reentry. 300-day PHI.

Omite 30WS

propargite

5–6 lb

Group 12C miticide. Postharvest use only. Each water soluble bag contains 2.5 lbs. 2-day reentry. No PHI.

Onager 1EC

hethythiazox

24 oz

Group 10A miticide. Postharvest use only. Do not rotate with other group 10A materials in the same season.
12-hour reentry. 28-day PHI.

Savey DF

hethythiazox

3–6 oz

Group 10A miticide. Does not control rust mites. Do not rotate with other group 10A materials in the same season.12-hour reentry. 28-day PHI.

Zeal 72WSP

etoxazole

2–3 oz

Group 10B insecticide. 12-hour reentry. 7-day PHI.

Increased fruit set

Solubor or
Borosol

5–8 lb

2–4 qt

Late September or early October use with 60 gal or more of water. Don’t mix boron sprays with pesticides. The elevated pH of the boron spray solution weakens many insecticides. Use this rate for foliar application.

Stage 0: Dormant season October and January

Pest or disease/
Material

Active ingredient (AI)

Application
rate/acre

Comments/Reentry interval/Preharvest interval (PHI)

Shothole
Note: Use of copper may increase bacterial canker in some orchards. If you use these products, apply the first spray in October before the fall rains and again in early January. Do not graze sheep in orchards sprayed with coppers. Toxic amounts of copper can build up in orchard soils after decades of use.

Bordeaux 12-12-100

See footnote 1.

Footnotes

  1. Bacteria resistant to copper products have been detected in many Willamette Valley crops. Some growers report control of bacterial canker by the application of bordeaux 12-12-100 in October and January; others report little or no control. Some research trials have shown that copper products can significantly increase this disease. If you choose to use copper-based products, thoroughly spray the trunks and lower scaffolds as well as the upper branches, and limit total number of applications. Bordeaux 12-12-100 means 12 lb of copper sulfate plus 12 lb of hydrated lime in 100 gal of water. In any bordeaux formula, the ingredients always are listed in the same order—copper sulfate, hydrated lime, then gallons of water.
  2. Young trees not being sprayed for brown rot may need an application of fungicide during bloom for adequate control of cherry leaf spot. This is more of a problem in high rainfall areas or years.
  3. Fungal pathogens have shown resistance to several fungicides when one is used exclusively. Alternate or tank-mix with fungicides with different modes of action. Fungicides from different FRAC groups have different modes of action. Some products may already be a mix of two different fungicides. One or two applications during bloom may adequately control brown rot when products with systemic (translaminar) activity are used.
  4. Shothole borer can have three generations in Valley orchards. Look for new adults and/or sawdust pushed from emergence holes in late winter, June/July, and again in September/October. This pest prefers young and/or stressed trees. Cultural controls include pruning of infested limbs, and severely infested trees should be removed before adult beetles emerge in spring. Maintaining tree vigor and health with a good nutrition program helps trees resist shothole borer. Chemical control is difficult and consists of spot-treating trunks and limbs when adults are emerging and reinvading during delayed dormant.
  5. Syneta beetle is a small, pale leaf- and fruit-feeding beetle that causes fruit scarring from shortly after pollination through the time cherries are pinhead size. It is a localized problem in the Valley and within orchard blocks. Adults begin emerging and feeding in orchards before bloom or as late as early fruit set. First emergence has been as early as April 6 or as late as early May depending upon elevation and slope of individual blocks. Beetles may be present for 4–6 weeks in an orchard. Best time for control is PREBLOOM (popcorn) if beetles are present. Imidan was historically the favored insecticide but can only be used on tart cherries. Do not introduce bees for 5 days post spray of this insecticide because of possible residues and associated bee kills. DO NOT APPLY IMIDAN TO TREES IN BLOOM! Spinosad (Entrust/Success) compounds have less risk for pollinators, but avoid spraying when bees are active. Ground emergence cages and “tap trays” for pear psylla monitoring are used to determine presence of Syneta.
  6. Alternate group 11 fungicides with a fungicide that has a different mode of action. Do not use more than two sequential applications. Sprayers used for Abound, QuiltXcel, Quadris Top or TopGuard EQ should not be used on apples such as Gala, Cox’s Orange Pippin, and McIntosh. Even a small amount of drift can severely impact these apple trees.
  7. Good information on the control of shothole in sweet cherry is lacking. Much of our information is derived for the same disease on peaches or almonds. Other materials also may be effective. Applications past shuck split may be needed in years when heavy spring rains continue past bloom.
  8. Monitor for spotted wing drosophila (SWD) with commercial traps or clear, quart-sized plastic deli cups with lids (or any plastic container). Drill or puncture about 10 3⁄16-inch holes near the rim of the cup for fly entry. Bait traps with pure (unflavored) apple cider vinegar plus a drop of unscented liquid soap or use commercial lures in bait traps or on sticky cards. Hang the trap in a shady, cool location within the tree canopy. Place traps just before fruit starts to change to its ripening color. Check traps weekly. Various kinds of flies will be captured in this nonspecific trap, so learn to identify SWD. Treatment thresholds have not been established, but preventive measures should be taken when the first SWD is captured and fruit starts to ripen. Chemical controls target adults and can help prevent females from laying eggs in fruit, but have limited effect on larvae feeding within the fruit. Many resources on management of SWD are available in the OSU Extension Catalog, catalog.extension.edu.

Effectiveness of fungicides and bactericides for control of cherry diseases

These ratings are relative rankings based on labeled application rates, good spray coverage, and proper spray timing. Actual levels of disease control will be influenced by these factors in addition to cultivar susceptibility, disease pressure and weather conditions.

Fungicide or bactericide

FRAC group

Properties

Brown rot

Powdery mildew

Shothole

Bacterial canker

Blossom blight

Fruit rot

Abound

11

Broad spectrum, fungicidal, locally systemic, protectant

Good

Good

Excellent**

Fair to good

Not effective

Bravo

M5

Broad spectrum, fungicidal, protectant

Good to fair

Not registered

Not effective

Good

Not effective

Cabrio

11

Broad spectrum, fungicidal, locally systemic, protectant

Good

Good

Excellent**

??

Not effective

Captan

M4

Broad spectrum, fungicidal, protectant

Good

Good

Not effective

Good to excellent

Not effective

Copper-based products

M1

Broad spectrum, Bact, fungicidal, protectant

Slight

Not registered

Slight

Good

Not effective

Echo 720

M5

Broad spectrum, fungicidal, protectant

Good to fair

Not registered

Not effective

Good

Not effective

Elevate

17

Fungicidal, narrow spectrum, protectant

Good to excellent

Good to excellent

Not effective

??

Not effective

Flint

11

Broad spectrum, fungicidal, locally systemic, protectant

Good

Fair to good

Excellent**

??

Not effective

Fontelis

7

Broad spectrum, fungicidal, protectant

Good to excellent

Good to excellent

Good

Good

Not effective

Gatten

U13

Fungicidal, narrow spectrum

???

???

Good

???

Not effective

Indar

3

Broad to narrow spectrum, curative, fungicidal, locally systemic, protectant

Excellent**

Excellent**

Slight**

??

Not effective

Inspire

3

Broad to narrow spectrum, curative, fungicidal, locally systemic, protectant

Fair to good**

Fair to good**

Good**

??

Not effective

HMO

Not classified

Eradicant, fungicidal, insecticidal, protectant

??

??

Good to excellent

??

??

Kaligreen

Bicarbonate

Eradicant, broad to narrow spectrum

??

??

Poor to slight

??

??

Magister

Not classified

Fungicidal

??

??

Good

??

??

Miravis

7

Broad spectrum, fungicidal, protectant

Good to excellent

Good to excellent

Good

Good

Not effective

Procure

3

Broad to narrow spectrum, curative, fungicidal, locally systemic, protectant

Good

??

Good**

??

Not effective

Quash

3

Broad to narrow spectrum, curative, fungicidal, locally systemic, protectant

Good to excellent

Good

Good**

??

Not effective

Quintec

13

Narrow spectrum, fungicidal, protectant

Not effective

Not effective

Good

Not effective

Not effective

Rally

3

Broad to narrow spectrum, curative, fungicidal, locally systemic, protectant

Good to fair

Good to fair

Fair**

Slight

Not effective

Rovral

2

Broad to narrow spectrum, fungicidal, locally systemic, protectant

Excellent**

Not registered

Not effective

Fair to good

Not effective

Sulfur

M2

Fungicidal, insecticidal, protectant, vapor active

Fair

Fair

Good

Not effective

Not effective

Syllit

U12

Broad spectrum, fungicidal, protectant

??

Slight

Not effective

??

None to slight

Tebucon

3

Broad to narrow spectrum, curative, fungicidal, locally systemic, protectant

Good to excellent

Good to excellent

Fair to good**

??

Not effective

Tilt

3

Broad to narrow spectrum, curative, fungicidal, locally systemic, protectant

Good to excellent

Good to excellent

Fair**

Slight

Not effective

Torino

U6

Fungicidal, protectant

????

????

Good to exc.

???

Not effective

Topsin M

1

Broad spectrum, curative, fungicidal, locally systemic

Good**

Good**

Fair**

Not effective

Not effective

TopGuard

3

Broad to narrow spectrum, curative, fungicidal, locally systemic, protectant

Good

Good

Good

??

Not effective

Vivando

U8

??

Not effective

Not effective

Fair to good

Not effective

Not effective

Ziram

M3

Broad spectrum, fungicidal, protectant

Slight

Slight

Not effective

Good to excellent

Not effective

Combination products

Luna Experience

3 + 7

Broad to narrow spectrum, fungicidal, locally systemic, protectant

Good

Good

Good**

??

Not effective

Luna Sensation

7 + 11

Broad spectrum, fungicidal, locally systemic, protectant

Good to excellent

Good to excellent

Excellent**

??

Not effective

Merivon

7 + 11

Broad spectrum, fungicidal, locally systemic, protectant

Good to excellent

Good to excellent

Excellent**

??

Not effective

Pristine

7 + 11

Broad spectrum, fungicidal, locally systemic, protectant

Good

Good

Good **

??

Not effective

Quilt

11 + 3

Broad to narrow spectrum, curative, fungicidal, locally systemic, protectant

Good to excellent

Good to excellent

Excellent**

??

Not effective

?? = no information available. **Resistant pathogens will lower the effectiveness of this fungicide.

OSU resources for plant protection

Information on plant protection is available from several sources at Oregon State University:

Using pesticides safely

Always read the label

The single most important approach to pesticide safety is to read the pesticide label before each use and then follow the directions. If still in doubt after reading the label, contact a person qualified to help evaluate the hazard of the chemical and its use. Qualified people include Extension specialists, county educators, pesticide product representatives, and retailers.

Pesticides are toxic and should be handled with care — but they can be used safely if you follow recommended precautions. Follow all label requirements, and strongly consider any recommendations for additional personal protective clothing and equipment. In addition to reading and following the label, other major factors in the safe and effective use of pesticides are the pesticide applicator’s qualifications, common sense, and positive attitude. Always take all safety precautions when using pesticides.

In case of accidents involving pesticides, see your doctor at once. It will help your doctor to know exactly which pesticide is involved. The label on the container gives this information. Take to the physician the pesticide label or information from the label, such as the product name, registration number of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, common name and percentage of active ingredient, and first aid instructions. If the label cannot be removed, take along the pesticide container (if not contaminated), but do not take it into the hospital or doctor’s office.

Pesticide safety checklist

  • Use pesticides only when necessary and as part of an Integrated Pest Management program.
  • Always read the label and follow the instructions.
  • Do not allow children to play around sprayers or mixing, storage and disposal areas.
  • Wear appropriate protective clothing and equipment.
  • Never eat, drink or smoke while handling pesticides.
  • Avoid drift into nontarget areas and pesticide runoff into streams, rivers, lakes, irrigation ponds and canals.
  • Avoid spilling materials on skin or clothing.
  • Have access to clean water, soap and first-aid supplies.
  • Keep pesticides in a dry and locked storage area away from food and feed.
  • Triple rinse or pressure rinse empty containers and dispose or recycle in accordance with state and local regulations.
  • Stay out of recently sprayed areas until the spray has dried, and observe the restricted entry intervals
    specified on the pesticide label.
  • Follow the pre-harvest interval on the pesticide label before harvesting crops or gardens and before allowing livestock to graze fields.

Emergency response for exposure and spills

  • For any pesticide exposure emergency, dial 911.
  • First aid for exposure is indicated on the pesticide label.
  • For information on poison emergency treatment call the National Poison Center Poison Help Line at 1-800-222-1222.
  • For emergency information related to pesticide spills contact the Oregon Emergency Response System at 1-800-452-0311.

Non-emergency information

  • General pesticide information — The National Pesticide Information Center provides objective, science-based information about pesticides and pesticide-related topics.Visit npic.orst.edu/index.html or call 1-800-858-7378.
  • Pesticide licensing and regulation — The Oregon Department of Agriculture regulates most aspects of pesticide use in the State of Oregon. Visit www.oregon.gov/ODA/programs/Pesticides/Pages/AboutPesticides.aspx or call 503-986-4635.
  • Worker protection — The federal Worker Protection Standard for Agricultural Pesticides protects agricultural workers from pesticide exposure at work. The Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Administration is the state agency responsible for administering the WPS in Oregon. Call 1-800-922-2689.
  • Pesticide waste — The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality regulates the disposal of pesticide waste in Oregon. Visit or call 503-229-5263.
  • The Tricounty Hazardous Waste and Recycling Program conducts periodic collection events for unused pesticides in Hood River, Sherman, and Wasco counties. Call 541-506-2632. Most area chemical distributors offer plastic pesticide container recycling. For information on container preparation, contact your chemical supplier.