4-H 9332    Published November 2019

This curriculum was created with funding from a Children Youth and Families at Risk federal grant and implemented through in-school and after-school 4-H programming as part of Oregon State University in Linn and Benton counties.

Our goal was to create fun, hands-on learning experiences to cultivate tangible skills for our youth participants.

The program was developed for middle school youth, but the lessons may be used with a variety of age groups. You may use the lessons individually or as a series. The recipes included are referenced for the lessons we paired them with, but can also be switched up. Use creativity as it pertains to your group’s interests, space and time frame. We had about 1 hour and 15 minutes to complete our lesson, activities, recipes and cleanup, but would recommend at least 1½ hours to 2 hours.

Lesson 1

MINI-LESSON: Why should I care about what I eat?

Learning goal

Understand the importance of eating a well-balanced, appropriate diet to provide short-term energy and long-term health.

What you need

  • Pencils
  • 2 different colors of paper, cut into quarters

Mini-lesson how-to

  1. Ask the group to stand in a circle.
  2. Give each member one small piece of paper (use two different colors) and pencil.
  3. Ask the youths to write one sentence answering the question “Why should I even care about what I eat?”
  4. When done, ask them to crumple the paper.
  5. On the count of three, throw papers in the middle of the circle.
  6. Ask the youths to choose a paper of a different color than the paper they wrote on.
  7. Ask for several volunteers to read what is on the papers.
  8. Once some (or all) of the answers have been read, discuss any themes that arose or ask where we formulate our own beliefs about nutrition.
  9. Share that the purpose of the program is to learn more about nutrition and cooking so that students may make healthy choices for themselves, which they can share with others.

ACTIVITY: Balloon match-up

Learning goal

This activity helps to teach the basics of kitchen hygiene, equipment handling and injury prevention.

What you need

  • Nutrition questions and answers
  • Activity facilitator
  • Balloons

Activity how-to

Ahead of time:
  1. Cut and separate the questions from the answers
  2. Roll the pieces of paper up and insert into the balloons. Do not add air to balloons yet.

    During program:

  3. Give each youth a balloon to blow up and tie.
  4. Ask youths to toss their balloons on the floor.
  5. Explain that each balloon has either a question or an answer, and the goal is to match them correctly.
  6. When the facilitator yells “Go,” students may pop the balloons, take out the paper and find their match.
  7. When they have found their match, ask students to line up next to each other.
  8. When all matches are found, the pairs will read their questions and answers out loud.
  9. Ask the youths to clean up the excess balloons and find a seat before beginning the next activity.

ROUND IT OUT

Prepare a sticker survey about students’ first impressions. Provide stickers and a poster with the title “Rate your experience today” and several emojis. Give each student a sticker as they leave and ask them to place it by the emoji that best matches their experience.
PAIR LESSON WITH THIS RECIPE: Chicken Avocado Roll-Ups

Lesson 2

MINI-LESSON: Meal preparation

Learning goal

Discuss the process of full meal preparation from start to finish and teach youth the importance of time management in the kitchen.

What you need

Four sets of cards (each with different meal prep steps), shuffled

Mini-lesson how-to

  1. Ask the youths to assemble into four groups.
  2. Provide each group with a set of shuffled meal prep cards.
  3. Ask students to organize the cards in order (to the best of their ability), from the start of meal prep to the end.
  4. Ask youths to share their results with the group.
  5. Ask: Which steps will take more time? Less time?
Post the results, so the youths can have a reminder of the process and can be aware of the time involved in each step.

ACTIVITY: Nutrition icebreaker

What you need

  • Activity facilitator
  • Beach ball with nutrition-related questions written on ball

Activity how-to

Ahead of time:
  1. Blow up a beach ball.
  2. Use a permanent marker to write simple nutrition questions all over the surface of the beach ball. Some examples: Name a fruit; What is a macronutrient? What is a source of protein?
During program:
  1. Ask the group of youths to form a circle.
  2. Explain the game: When the ball is tossed, the person who catches it will attempt to answer the question that lands on their right pinkie finger.
  3. Toss the beach ball to a random student.
  4. The person who catches the beach ball will say their name and then try to answer the question.
  5. After finishing, the student will gently toss the ball to another student.
  6. Repeat until all students have participated.

ROUND IT OUT

Prepare a sticker survey about students’ first impressions. Provide stickers and a poster with the title “Rate your experience today” and several emojis. Give each student a sticker as they leave and ask them to place it by the emoji that best matches their experience.
PAIR LESSON WITH THIS RECIPE:
Grilled Cheese and Tomato Sammie

Lesson 3

MINI-LESSON: Handwashing

Learning goal

To understand the importance of proper hand-washing.

Mini-lesson how-to

  1. Ask students what they already know about handwashing.
  2. Ask them why they think handwashing is important.
    • Why is it important to wash your hands with soap?
    • Why is it important to use warm water?
    • Why is it important to turn the faucet off with a paper towel?
  3. Explain the consequences of not properly washing hands: illness, cross-contamination of bacteria (such as from raw chicken or fish), or general poor hygiene.

ACTIVITY: Hand-washing

What you need

  • Glo Germ Gel (available online)
  • Blacklight flashlight
  • Handwashing handout

Activity how-to

  1. Ask students to apply the Glo Germ to their hands according to the directions.
  2. Shine the black light on their hands and explain that bacteria like to hide in these areas of their hands.
  3. Instruct youths to wash their hands, following proper hand-washing guidelines.
  4. Shine the black light again so they can see how well they washed their hands.
  5. Repeat if necessary, so youth know how well to wash their hands to get rid of bacteria.

ROUND IT OUT

Reflect on the importance of washing hands and how it can help reduce cross-contamination and the spread of illness.

PAIR LESSON WITH THIS RECIPE: Chicken Chili with Sweet Potatoes

Lesson 4

MINI-LESSON: Knife skills

Learning goal

To learn how to properly use knives

What you need

Knife skills and safety handout

Mini-lesson how-to

  1. Give each student the knife skills handout.
  2. Briefly explain each knife and what it does.

    ACTIVITY: Knife skills

    What you need

    Access to short video

    Activity how-to

  1. Show video clip of knife-holding basics.
  2. Demonstrate how to hold and cut ingredients properly.

    Key points

    • Holding the knife properly
    • Cupping your guiding hand
    • Using the right knives for each cut or task

      ROUND IT OUT

      Reflect on what the youths found interesting or useful today. Do they feel more confident using a knife at home to help prepare meals?

      PAIR LESSON WITH THIS RECIPE: Taco Salad

      Lesson 5

      MINI-LESSON: Eat a rainbow

      Learning goal

      To understand the importance of eating a colorful variety of foods and learn how to create a colorful meal or snack.

      Mini-lesson how-to

      1. Ask the youth and have a discussion about what they know about diet variety and colorful eating.
      2. Explain that an important aspect of a healthy diet is having a variety of colors on your plate to maximize nutrients.

      ACTIVITY: Choose My Plate

      What you need

      • Access to tablets or personal computers for each youth
      • MyPlate template handout for each youth
      • Wi-Fi access
      • Pens/pencils

      Activity how-to

      1. Ask the youths to log on to choosemyplate.gov. Scroll down to the interactive model of MyPlate.
      2. Ask students to explore each section to learn different types of foods they could use to build a colorful plate.
      3. The youths will build a meal using the template handout.

        ROUND IT OUT

        Ask students to reflect on why it is important to eat a variety of colors in their diets. What colors do they need more of?

        PAIR LESSON WITH THIS RECIPE: Turkey Tostadas with Pineapple Salsa

        Lesson 6

        MINI-LESSON: Reading nutrition labels

        Learning goal

        To help youth understand the importance of reading a nutrition label and have the skills to make an educated decision before purchasing or consuming a product.

        Mini-lesson how-to

      4. Ask the youths if they have ever seen or read a nutrition label on a packaged food item. What did they notice, if anything?
      5. Discuss the importance of knowing how to read food labels to be informed about the ingredients and nutrients in the food you eat.
      6. List briefly the things you might find on a food label (calories, fats, serving size, sugars, etc.). Mention the things to look out for, such as hydrogenated oils and trans fats, sugar and sodium.

      ACTIVITY: Reading nutrition labels

      What you need:

      • Enough food labels (printed items, or on tablets or computers) to give to every two students: one healthy and one unhealthy
      • Nutrition label reading tips
      • Label comparison worksheet
      • Pencils
      • Tape (if you choose to hang labels or stick them to a table)

      Activity how-to:

      1. Split into groups of two to three youths.
      2. Provide one unhealthy label (A) and one healthy label (B).
      3. Give each youth a “Nutrition label reading tips” handout.
      4. Ask students to fill out the worksheet to determine which snack is healthier.
      5. After eight to 10 minutes, ask each group to present to the class why they believe their chosen label is healthier than the other one.

      ROUND IT OUT

      Ask youth when they can use their label-reading skills to eat healthier foods.

      PAIR LESSON WITH THeSe RECIPEs:
      Lasagna Rolls
      Skillet Chicken Lasagna Roll-ups

      Handout: Nutrition label reading tips

      • Pay attention to serving size.
      • If you don’t know what the ingredient is, it’s probably processed.
      • Look for five or fewer REAL ingredients.
      • Minimize saturated fats and avoid trans fats.
      • Look for foods low in fat, cholesterol, sodium and sugar.
      • Choose foods high in fiber, protein and vitamins.
      • Ingredients are listed in order of weight or quantity, so the first ingredient is what makes up the bulk of the food item.
      • Look at Percent Daily Value to see what nutrients you’ll get.
      • Watch out for processed sugars (high fructose corn syrup) and artificial sugars (aspartame, sucralose).
      • Avoid foods with dyes.

      Lesson 7

      MINI-LESSON: Portion size

      Learning goal

      Discuss the importance of calories consumed per day and the distribution of those calories. Learn how understanding portion size can help.

      What you need

      Tablets or computers, open to choosemyplate.gov

      Mini-lesson how-to

      1. Divide youths into groups of four to five. Give each group a tablet computer. Ask students to open a browser and find the choosemyplate.gov shortcut.
      2. Go to Online Tools –> MyPlate Plan –> START
      3. Youths will need to enter their sex, average age, height, weight and activity level. This will help them calculate the number of calories they should aim to consume per day. Help them calculate group averages if needed.
      4. Click on the calorie amount to get a detailed explanation of portion size per food group.
      5. Click on view PDF in the upper right corner for easy reading.

      ACTIVITY: Portion size

      What you need

      • Tablet computers (open to choosemyplate.gov)
      • Serving size guide
      • Food items for each food group (rice, cheese, peas, blueberries, tofu)
      • Measuring devices ( scale, measuring cups)

      Activity how-to

      1. Now that the youths have figured out their calories and portion sizes, assign each group a food group.
      2. Once assigned a food group, youth can start the worksheet and portion out food using the measuring tools provided.
      3. Once everyone is finished, each group presents their food group to the class.
      4. Explain that all the food group portion sizes add up to what a healthy individual should try to eat in one day.

      Probing questions

      • What can affect the amount of calories your body needs?
      • Why might you need more or less?
      • How can you still have variety while sticking to the serving size?

      ROUND IT OUT

      Ask the students why it is important to pay attention to serving and portion sizes at mealtime.

      PAIR LESSON WITH THIS RECIPE:

      Tacos

      Serving Size Guide

      Grains

      Girls: 5 ounces per day
      Boys: 6 ounces per day

      1 ounce of grains is equal to:

      • 1 slice of bread
      • 1 mini bagel
      • 5 whole wheat crackers
      • 1 packet of instant oatmeal
      • 1 medium-sized pancake
      • ½ cup cooked rice or pasta
      • 1 small flour tortilla or corn tortilla

      Vegetables

      Girls: 2 cups per day
      Boys: 2½ cups per day

      1 cup vegetables is equal to:

      • 12 baby carrots
      • 1 red bell pepper
      • 1 large sweet potato
      • 1 large ear of corn
      • 2 large stalks celery

      Fruit

      Girls: 1½ cups per day
      Boys: 1½ cups per day

      1 cup of fruit is equal to:

      • 1 small apple
      • 2 snack containers of applesauce
      • 1 large banana
      • 32 grapes
      • 1 large orange
      • 1 large peach
      • 8 large strawberries
      • 1 cup of fruit juice

      Dairy

      Girls: 3 cups per day
      Boys: 3 cups per day

      1 cup of dairy is equal to:

      • 1 cup of milk
      • 1 regular container of yogurt
      • 2 slices of cheese
      • 2 cups of cottage cheese

      Meat

      Girls: 5 ounces per day
      Boys: 5 ounces per day

      1 ounce of protein is equal to:

      • 1 slice of sandwich turkey
      • 1 egg
      • 12 almonds
      • 27 pistachios
      • 1 Tbsp peanut butter

      1 small hamburger is 3 ounces!

      Lesson 8

      MINI-LESSON: How much sugar?

      Learning goal

      Youths will be able to calculate the amount of sugar present in their food and beverage choices.

      Mini-lesson how-to

      1. Ask students to think back to the previous lesson about reading nutrition labels. Ask them to think about what things you can find on a label.
      2. Remind students that one thing to pay attention to on nutrition labels is the number of grams of sugar, because many processed foods have added sugars that can be bad for your health if not consumed in moderation.
      3. Ask the youths if they know how much sugar is in their processed foods and drinks.

      ACTIVITY: How much sugar?

      What you need

      • Funnels
      • Sugar
      • Teaspoons
      • Bowls
      • Baggies
      • Calculators or cellphones
      • Measuring cups
      • “Rethink your drink” worksheet and drink labels

      Activity how-to

      1. Hand out the “Rethink your drink” worksheet and preprinted drink labels.
      2. Ask students to fill out the worksheet for one beverage.
      3. Ask them to calculate the number of teaspoons in their beverage.
      4. Ask them to measure out the amount of white sugar in their beverage in a plastic baggie to visualize the amount of sugar consumed.
      5. Ask each group to present to the rest of the group.

      BONUS ACTIVITY: Group video

      What you need

      • Camera phones or video cameras
      • Group video instructions
      • Drink labels
      • Sugar
      • Teaspoons
      • Bowls

      Activity how-to

      1. Divide students into small groups. Give each group a label and a recording device.
      2. Ask them to make 30-second videos in which each member participates. The video will show how many teaspoons of sugar are in the drink.
      3. Share the videos with other students and the students’ families.

      ROUND IT OUT

      Talk about how you can reduce sugar in your diet by making your own drinks and treats.

      PAIR LESSON WITH this RECIPE: No-Bake SunButter Energy Balls

      How much sugar: Group video instructions

      You will be making videos, about 30 seconds long, about your sugary drink. Everyone needs to participate in a role.

      Make sure to include:

      • Name of drink product (show the picture).
      • The number of grams of sugar in your drink product.
      • Show how many teaspoons that is.
      • One message to your family about how to reduce sugar intake and to improve their health!

      Video tips:

      • Speak clearly
      • No background noise
      • Include fun visuals
      • Look at the camera
      • Include humor
      • Choose a good background

      Lesson 9

      MINI-LESSON: Macronutrients

      Learning goal

      Learn about the three macronutrients, what types of foods are in each group, and how they help our health.

      Mini-lesson how-to

      1. Introduce macronutrients as the part of our diet that gives us energy. The three types are: carbohydrates, proteins and fats.
      2. Briefly introduce each type, explaining what they do for our body. (Carbs are our main source of energy, protein builds muscle and DNA, and fats keep us warm and protect our organs.)
      3. Explain, without giving away too many examples, what types of foods are in each group. Carbohydrates have sugars, proteins often come from animal products, and fats mostly come from nuts and seeds.

      ACTIVITY: Macronutrient matching

      What you need

      • 1 list of foods and 1 worksheet for each group
      • Markers/colored pencils

      Activity how-to

      1. Give each group a paper with different foods and a worksheet divided into three sections: carbohydrates, proteins and fats.
      2. Ask groups to work together to decide what foods go in each group. (If time allows, ask them to draw a picture of the food in the designated box.)
      3. Discuss and review once everyone is finished. Talk about how some foods have more than one macronutrient. Best example: Dairy has all three!

      ROUND IT OUT

      Ask students to think of their favorite meal and how they can make it a complete macronutrient meal (if it isn’t already).

      PAIR LESSON WITH this RECIPE:
      Southwestern Chicken Pita Pockets

      Lesson 9A

      MINI-LESSON: Carbohydrates

      Learning goal

      To understand what macronutrients are and how they relate to our diet, over three lessons; to learn about different types of grains and their components.

      What you need

      Grain diagram handout.

      Mini-lesson how-to:

      1. Review, from the previous lesson, what a macronutrient is. Remind the youths that macronutrients are the part of our diets that give us energy. The three macronutrients are carbohydrates, proteins and fats.
      2. Introduce carbohydrates as the macronutrient for this lesson. Explain to the youths that grains are a great way to get carbohydrates in the body. (Emphasize that this is not the only way to get carbohydrates).
      3. Explain that there are two types of grains: whole grains and refined grains. Introduce whole grains as a healthier grain, and refined grains as something we should consume in moderation.
      4. Give each youth a grain diagram handout. Talk through the diagram, briefly explaining each component of a grain. Tie this together with why whole grains are a healthier choice than refined grains.

      ACTIVITY: Grains

      What you need

      Grain sample kit (these can be purchased as a set or you can create your own with grains from your local grocery store).

      Activity how-to

      1. Ask the youths to name grains they have eaten as part of their diets.
      2. Arrange grain samples on a table and ask the youths to form a line.
      3. Allow each youth to touch, feel and observe the common grains they might find in their daily diets, and even unusual grains that they may have never heard of (buckwheat, millet, etc.).

      ROUND IT OUT

      Reflect on the importance of whole grains in our diet and how versatile they can be.

      PAIR LESSON WITH THIS RECIPE:
      Mexican Quinoa

      Lesson 9B

      MINI-LESSON: Protein

      Learning goal

      Learn about the second component of macronutrients: proteins, and the dietary sources of protein.

      Mini-lesson how-to

      1. Remind students that they are learning about macronutrients. Briefly review that the first macronutrient they learned about — carbohydrates, our main source of energy.
      2. Introduce the next macronutrient: protein. Ask the youths what they know about protein (what it is, where we get it, etc.).
      3. Explain that proteins are made up of amino acids which are used to build our bodies and make our DNA. Give some examples of common, healthy proteins in our diets.

      ACTIVITY: Protein posters

      What you need

      • Word bank/picture bank of protein examples (each printed on a different color)
      • Large poster boards or poster paper
      • Tape/push pins for poster paper
      • Tape/sticky tack for protein examples
      • Scissors

      Activity how-to

      Ahead of time:

      1. Write, in large, easy-to-read letters, one protein category on each poster board and poster paper. (Poultry, eggs, meat, seafood, fish, legumes, and one category for nuts/seeds).
      2. Hang each category around your classroom or teaching space with tape or push pins.

        During program:

      3. Split the youths into four groups.
      4. Provide each group with a list of protein examples, either words or pictures. Make sure each group has a different color of paper. Ask the youths to cut up their examples.
      5. Give the youths five minutes to “race” and see which group can correctly identify and categorize the different proteins. They can stick their examples to the posters with either tape or sticky tack.
      6. After five minutes, or after the first group finishes, ask each group to present a category and discuss what they learned.

      ROUND IT OUT

      Reflect on different ways we can get protein in our diets and why it is important.

      PAIR LESSON WITH this RECIPE: Spring Rolls
      Provide different protein options to add in.

      Lesson 9C

      MINI-LESSON: Fats

      Learning goal

      To learn about the final macronutrient, fat. Learn the different types of fat and the health benefits and concerns of each.

      What you need

      Access to an online video (projector screen, tablet computers or personal computers)

      Mini-lesson how-to

      1. Remind students that they are learning about macronutrients. Briefly review carbohydrates and proteins as the two macronutrients they have learned so far.
      2. Introduce fats as the final macronutrient. Explain that healthy fats help us store energy, help keep us warm and protect our internal organs. Fat can also store certain vitamins for later use.
      3. Describe three types of fats: saturated, unsaturated and trans fats. Briefly explain the health benefits or health concerns of each, and the types of foods that fall into each category. (Saturated fats are typically found in meats and cheese; unsaturated fats are typically found in nuts, seeds, and oils; trans fats are typically found in processed foods such as cookies, cakes and candies).
      4. Show the TedEd video about fats
      5. Ask three students to share something they learned from the video.

      ACTIVITY: Fat taste test

      What you need

      • Sample foods for each type of fat
      • Unsaturated: Kalamata olive
      • Saturated: salami
      • Trans: processed cookie/cake
      • Dot stickers (three different colors, preferably green, yellow and red)
      • Three pieces of paper, each labeled with one of the types of food you will provide
      • Blindfolds
      • Serving platters or plates
      • Fats handout

      Activity how-to

      Ahead of time

      1. Prepare samples of each type of fat, enough for each youth. Arrange them on a serving platter or plate, covered.
      2. Line up each platter or plate along a table in your teaching space. Place the three labeled papers at the end of the table.

        During the program

      3. Depending on the number of facilitators, ask for youth volunteers to hand out samples in the activity (for those who do not want to try the foods).
      4. Ask youths to form a line and put on a blindfold. Have them (slowly and carefully) walk down the line and try one sample of each type of food. See if they can identify the foods.
      5. Once each participant has tried all three samples, ask the students to remove their blindfolds. Hand each youth three dot stickers (one of each color). Tell them that the green represents unsaturated fats, yellow is saturated fats, and red is trans fats.
      6. Ask the youths to place stickers on each paper corresponding to the category they think the sample food belongs to.
      7. Reveal the answers. Ask the youths what they noticed about the different samples, and what that might mean for the different fats.
      8. Pass out the fats handout.

      ROUND IT OUT

      Reflect on different types of fats and what types you should avoid or eat in moderation. Reiterate that fat is not bad for you!

      ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

    • Facts about fats: Handout

      • Fats give us the most energy of any macronutrient!
      • Fat protects our organs.
      • Fat helps us absorb certain vitamins.
      • Fat keeps us warm.
      • Fats add flavor to foods.
      • Having body fat is completely normal.
      • Eating too many foods with bad fats can lead to heart disease.
      • You should get between 10 and 15 grams of good fats per day!

      Some science behind fats

      • The scientific name for fat molecules is lipids.
      • Chains of fat molecules are called triglycerides, and they can be short, medium, or long.
      • The process of breaking down fats in the body is called lipolysis.

      ★ Unsaturated fats

      • Typically liquid at room temperature
      • Found in nuts, oils, fish and avocados
      • The best fat!

      ✔ Saturated fats

      • Solid at room temperature
      • Considered a “bad fat,” but OK in moderation
      • Found in red meat, milk, butter and cheese

      ✖ Trans fats

    • Found in processed foods and snacks
      or fast food
    • The worst fat; you should always try to avoid trans fat in large amounts.

      Lesson 10

      MINI-LESSON: Micronutrients

      Learning goal

      To learn about the three types of micronutrients and how to get them in your diet.

      Mini-lesson how-to

      1. Remind the youth that previously they learned about macronutrients, which provide energy for our bodies.
      2. Introduce the other type of nutrient — micronutrients — as the small components of our diet that don’t give us calories or energy, but are essential to many other body functions.
      3. Introduce the three types of micronutrients: vitamins, minerals and water.
      4. Explain that vitamins support our immune system and assist in healthy growth and organ function. Give examples. (Vitamin A keeps our eyes healthy; Vitamin C strengthens our immune system. Minerals such as calcium build strong bones and help our brain and muscles work properly.)

      ACTIVITY: Micronutrient search

      What you need

      • Food models or a paper bag with names of foods
      • Pens
      • Tablet computers or internet access
      • Micronutrient worksheets (page 42)

      Activity how-to

      1. Split the youths into groups and give each group a handout, pens and a tablet or other device with internet access.
      2. Ask each group to pick two food items from the bag.
      3. Each group will use the internet to research their two foods, filling in the questions on their worksheets. (Have the youth start with one food, and do the second if time permits).

      ROUND IT OUT

      Discuss how micronutrients are just as important as macronutrients even though they don’t give us calories or energy. What did students learn about how to get micronutrients in their diets?

      PAIR LESSON WITH this RECIPE: Greek-Style Couscous

      micronutrients: Worksheet

      Food 1

      Look on the back of your chosen food. What are the micronutrients listed? Pick two micronutrients your food provides. Google them to see what they do for the body.

      Micronutrient 1

      What does it do for the body?

      Micronutrient 2

      What does it do for the body?

      Food 2

      Look on the back of your chosen food. What are the micronutrients listed? Pick two micronutrients your food provides. Google them to see what they do for the body!

      Micronutrient 1

      What does it do for the body?

      Micronutrient 2

      What does it do for the body?

      Lesson 11

      MINI-LESSON: The five food groups

      Learning goal

      To learn about each food group, the types of foods it includes, and their benefits.

      Mini-lesson how-to

    1. Ask students to name the five food groups.
    2. Discuss the food groups and list examples of foods that are in each group.

      ACTIVITY: Food group videos

      What you need

      • Video camera access/tablet computers
      • Craft supplies (markers, paper, colored paper, etc.)
      • Instruction sheet

        Activity how-to

      1. Split youths into five groups.
      2. Assign each group one of the five food groups.
      3. Instruct each group to make a 20- to 30-second video about their food group. Videos should include the name of their food group, what macronutrients are included, examples of foods within the group and one to two fun facts. (See instruction sheet, page 44.)
      4. Encourage youths to be creative! They can draw pictures of foods or make fun, small signs to hold while they talk about their food group.
      5. Ask each group to share their videos at the end. Or, facilitators can edit them into one video to watch together on another day.

        ROUND IT OUT

        Discuss the five food groups and why each is important to a balanced diet.

        PAIR LESSON WITH this recipe: Frozen Fruit Smoothie
        Provide additional add-ins such as spinach and protein powder.

        Five food group video: Instructions

        You will be making videos, about 30 seconds long, about your assigned food group. Everyone needs to participate in a role.

        Make sure to include:

        • What your food group is.
        • What macronutrients are involved in your food group. (Remember, the three macronutrients are carbohydrates, protein and fats.)
        • Examples of food included in your food group.
        • One or two other health benefits or fun facts about your food group.

        Lesson 12

        MINI-LESSON: Meal planning

        Learning goal

        To apply nutrition knowledge to real-life experience by developing skills to plan meals.

        Mini-lesson how-to

        1. Begin by asking students if they have ever helped their caretakers go grocery shopping or plan meals. Ask a few youths to share what they have observed or learned from these experiences.
        2. Ask: “How can planning meals and a grocery list ahead of time help you eat healthier and save money?”

        ACTIVITY: Meal planning

        What you need

        • A variety of cookbooks or Internet access (tablets)
        • Meal planning and grocery list handouts
        • Pens/pencils

        Activity how-to

        1. Split into groups of four.
        2. Give each group the two handouts and writing utensils.
        3. For the meal planning worksheet: Brainstorm or use cookbooks or the internet to find names of simple recipes they would make for each meal for a week. (Depending on time available, fill in a few days.)
        4. Tell students to make sure their meals are healthy and include all of the food groups when creating their weekly menus. Tell them to consider using grocery items in more than one recipe, or for between-meal snacks.
        5. Once they are done with writing names of recipes on their meal plan, ask them to write a list of the groceries necessary to make these dishes using the grocery list worksheet. Tell them to think about the recipes included in their meal planning sheet and write down the main ingredients. They do not need to include pantry staples such as salt, pepper, flour or sugar on their grocery list.
        6. For the grocery list worksheet: Think about the recipes included in their meal planning sheet and write down the main ingredients under each category.
        7. Ask youths to share some of their meal ideas and the thinking behind their choices.
        8. Let the students keep their weekly menu and encourage them to use it at home. Allow them to take pictures of the recipes or write down recipe links from the internet.

        ROUND IT OUT

        Discuss why meal planning can help you feel organized about your food decisions, help you avoid unhealthy impulse purchases and help you stay on a budget.

        PAIR LESSON WITH a vegetable stir fry recipe of your choice

        Lesson 13

        MINI-LESSON: Digestion

        Learning goal

        To learn the fundamental anatomy and functions of the digestive system.

        What you need

        • Access to video
        • Tablet computer or digital viewing system for video

        Mini-lesson how-to

        Cue the movie to play for the youth once you have introduced the topic. An introduction may include something like: “The digestive system is a complex and necessary system for us to get energy, nutrients and enjoyment out of the food we eat. Let’s take a closer look at the components that make up our digestive system. Play close attention to the names of the different anatomical parts, as you’ll need them for the activity.”

        ACTIVITY: Play-Doh digestion model

        What you need

        • Play-Doh (at least three colors per group)
        • Wax paper
        • Printed digestive system diagram (page 49)

        Activity how-to

        1. Ask students to write the names of the anatomical features they learned in the digestive system video in the boxes provided on the diagram.
        2. Once the anatomy is correctly written in and checked by a facilitator, they will put the wax paper over the diagram.
        3. The final piece is to re-create the digestive system with Play-Doh. They will use the diagram under the wax paper as a guide.
        4. The activity is complete when they have correctly named and molded the digestive system into a Play-Doh model.

          ROUND IT OUT

          Reflect on how different foods may affect our digestive system differently. For example, what may be easier for our bodies to digest: a fruit smoothie or trail mix? Why?

          PAIR LESSON WITH this RECIPE: The Perfect 5-Minute Omelet

          Lesson 14

          MINI-LESSON: Hydration

          Learning goal

          To think critically about importance of hydration. Students will be able to calculate how much water individuals should drink per day to provide hydration for daily activities.

          What you need

          • Hydration worksheets
          • Pens/pencils

        Mini-lesson how-to

        Provide the hydration worksheet to small groups of two to three students and ask them to find the missing words.

        ACTIVITY: Hydration

        What you need

        • Water bottles (one 16.9 oz. bottle per student)
        • Sharpies
        • Calculators
        • 9-oz. cups

        Activity how-to

        1. Using the hydration calculation on the worksheet: Youths enter the number of pounds they weigh (or an estimate) and then divide by 2 using calculators. Write that number down on their worksheet.
        2. Students take that number and divide it by 8. Since there are 8 ounces of water in each cup, the answer is how many cups of water they should drink per day. Ask them to write that number on their cups. There are spaces for each person in the group.
        3. Students use the water bottle to pour one 8-oz. cup of water into the cup and drink it. Refill the cup and drink it.

        ROUND IT OUT

        As a group, talk about why water is vital for living. Give specific examples. What happens when you don’t stay hydrated?

        PAIR LESSON WITH this RECIPE: Asian-Style Chicken and Pineapple Lettuce Wraps

        Hydration: Worksheet

        Hydration is the process of causing something to absorb water.

        1. Water helps __________ nutrients into body cells.
        2. Not drinking water causes you to become __________________, which leads to muscle fatigue, heat stroke, cramps and loss of coordination.
        3. Water makes up _______ percent of your total body weight.
        4. You can’t live for ___________________ a week without water. You can live without food for several weeks.
        5. An early sign of dehydration is ____________________________.

        Circle all the symptoms of dehydration:

        Sneezing Elevated heart rate Joint pain Clammy skin

        Stuffy nose Shortness of breath Coughing Dry mouth

        Chills Itchiness Dizziness Shakiness

        Nausea Fatigue Headache

        Hydration: Calculation

        Person 1

        _______÷ 2 = ________ ÷ 8 oz. = ________ # of cups of water you should drink a day

        Person 2

        ________÷ 2 = ________÷ 8 oz. = ________ # of cups of water you should drink a day

        Person 3

        ________÷ 2 = ________÷ 8 oz. = ________ # of cups of water you should drink a day

        Hydration: Worksheet answers

        1. Water helps transport nutrients into body cells.
        2. Not drinking water causes you to become dehydrated, which leads to muscle fatigue, heat stroke, cramps and loss of coordination.
        3. Water makes up 60 percent of your total body weight.
        4. You can’t live for more than a week without water. You can live without food for several weeks.
        5. An early sign of dehydration is thirst.

        Symptoms of dehydration include:

        Elevated heart rate, shortness of breath, clammy skin, dry mouth, chills, dizziness, nausea, fatigue and headache.

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